This was interesting to look at. My first look was using wools and just trying vertical lines and then moving at an angle. My thought was ‘pretty’.  So that is not good enough!  I changed to black cotton and mercerised embroidery cotton and just worked on lines.  Again, this seemed a little sterile and I found that I forced myself to do this.  The yellow lines where stitched closely give an interesting effect and I could see a texture application. The green lines however are clinical.

straightlines, wool, whipped stitches
straightlines, wool, whipped stitches
straightlines, mercerised embroidery cotton
straightlines, mercerised embroidery cotton

Moving to curved lines, I felt inspired and full of fun. I could have carried on and on. I felt shapes and lines and images developing as the needle went into the cloth. I started with the waved lines, and the mathematical symmetry. Despite the colours of the thread I can feel water, fishes movement. I loved the lines of fly stitch coming from the circles, and the lines of french knots, they give a floating impression.  I tried to replicate some of the mark making done in pencil during the initial exercises and hence the stubbly circles with the french knot in the centre. This is an effective stitch set and I can see it already into my next exercise as I will use it in a small form to image the stubbly nature of the seed pods.  I also liked the open cretan stitch.  So much to try out….. This was much better than the straight lines for me.

curved lines show movement, flow, tensions and expression
curved lines show movement, flow, tensions and expression